0
  • Search

Case Study


Vet Tips

  • Re-Hydrate regularly.
  • Swimming & Supervision

Did you know ?

  • Interesting facts about cat
  • Interesting facts about dog
Download

Testimonials

  • This is to certify that I have used FIPROFORT – PLUS SPOT ON on various dogs against ticks and fleas. I have found the Spot- On very useful in routine practice.
    Different size depending on body weight of pet dogs and technology with each application is very good.
    The product can be safely advised for treatment/eradication of ticks and fleas in dogs.
    Dr. Udaya ravi Bhat M. S., Bangalore
    B.V.Sc.
  • STAPHBAN- Agood replacement to the human equivalent. Excellent results in stubborn ulcerated wounds and deep seated non- healing wounds. VISIOCARE- Good results seen in cases of KCS

    Dr. Priyadarshani Govind, Chennai
    M.V.Sc (Surgery)
  • Your product STAPHBAN, I haveused regularly against pyoderma, cut wounds and post operative cases and I got very good results.

    Dr. Biwa Kumar Saha, Kolkata
    B.V.Sc
  • I am very much satisfied by using CARODYL 25 in canine practice for pain reliever.

    Dr. Dilip Kumar Das, Kolkata, M.V.Sc
  • "It is my plesure to inform you about feedback for your products Fiprofortplus spot on for ectoparasite control. 

    I am pretty happy and convinced with the result and availability. 

    Kudos to your sales team!"

    Thanks and Regards, 
    Dr. Makrand Chavan B.V.Sc. & AH. MVSc 
  • "  I personally used FIPROFORT spray and FIPROFORT PLUS  spot on on number of dogs and within weeks’ time I found all cases are free of ticks, fleas and even flea eggs. The result of FIPROFORT plus are excellent and satisfactory, it’s been highly prescribed by me in my day to day practice. "
    - Dr. Bapat
  • " This is to certify that Fiprofort “Spot On” has been used by me at my clinic. I find this effective with no adverse reactions. "
    - Dr. S.V.Sujatha
  •  "This is nice to share the feelings regarding the treatment results of tick menace of pets by using Fiprofort Plus, the combination of Fipronil and S-Methoprene. It is working excellent and the feedback from elite pet owner is very Satisfactory. "

    Dr. A. Ravi Kumar 
    M.V.Sc 
    Consultant Physician & Surgeon 

Vet Tips

 

 

Re-hydrate regularly - Increased output or decreased input of water from body can cause dehydration. Dehydration often accompanies vomiting, diarrhea, hypothermia, fever, no access to water, and other conditions. Dehydration and its severity can be diagnosed by skin turgor test.  If the skin is slow to return to position, the animal is at least 5% dehydrated. If the skin does not return fully to its position, the animal is 10% to 12% dehydrated and is likely in critical condition. Sunken and Dry eyes also indicate dehydration. Tongue and gums appear dry in dehydration.

  • Pet owner can give frequent, small amounts of water by mouth.
  • Move the pet to a cool (not cold) environment.
  • Avoid feeding of dry food and immediate access to ample amount of water after dehydration.
  • Dogs and cats can become thirsty fast, so give your companions plenty of water when they are outdoors or indoor. Shady places are important so Fido can escape the sun when the heat rises.
  • Contact your Vet in case of moderate and severe dehydration of your pet.


Swimming & Supervision- Don’t assume all dogs are natural swimmers - Most dogs are not! While swimming can be great exercise for dogs and cats don’t leave pets’ unsupervised while in the pool, or when they even have access to it. 

  • Owners  should introduce their dogs to the water slowly and be aware of your pets swimming abilities.
  • Don't allow your dog to become overly tired in the water.
  • After swimming rinse your pet’s coats off with clean water. When possible, insides of ears should be cleaned with ear cleaning solution.


Abscess – If infection introduced from an animal bite or other penetrating wound it cause an accumulation of pus.

  • If it is open, clean the wound with soap and water. Rinse well and pat dry. Repeat this several times a day.  
  • Don’t apply detergent.
  •  If there is swelling, apply warm, moist compresses for 10 to 15 minutes. Repeat 3 or 4 times daily. Warm compresses help to accelerate the process.
  • Do not attempt to open the abscess yourself. Do not go for self-medication.
  • Contact your Vet as soon as possible. Vet may go for incision and drainage and sometimes antibiotics therapy.

 

Bee Stings / Insect Bites- A bite or sting by insect, ants or bee can cause swelling, redness, and itching. Your pet’s face may look swollen.

  • Stinger can be pulled out very cautiously.
  • In recent bite don’t put pressure on venom sac as it may push much venom in your pet. You can apply cool compresses on such area.
  • Apply a paste mixture of baking soda to neutralize some of the acidic venom.
  • Don’t go for any medication without consent from your Vet.

 

Bleeding- Sudden and severe blood loss can lead to shock and even death if more than 30 to 40% of the total blood volume is lost and the condition is not treated quickly with intravenous fluids or blood transfusions, or both.  Pet owners must know some basics to stop bleeding.

  • Gently press a compress (a pad of clean cloth or gauze) over the bleeding absorbing the blood and allowing it to clot. Do not disturb blood clots after they have formed. In the absence of a compress, a bare hand or finger can be used.
  • If there is a bleeding from the foot or leg, gently elevate the leg so that the wound is above the level of the heart. Elevation of a limb combined with direct pressure is an effective way to stop bleeding. Finger or thumb pressure over the main artery to the wound is needed.
  • Pressure above the wound will help control arterial bleeding. Pressure below the wound will help control bleeding from veins.
  • Use of a tourniquet is dangerous and it should be used only for a severe, life-threatening hemorrhage in a limb (leg or tail). Regular loosening of tourniquet is essential.
  • If your pet looks pale and his extremities are cold, these may be signs of bleeding inside body. In such cases your Vet should immediately be contacted.

 

Bloat-  If you observe symptoms in your pet as drooling of saliva, frequent retching and attempts to vomit, anxiousness, restlessness, depression and shock, it may be condition called bloat. In this condition stomach gets filled with gas and twists around itself. It may prove fatal. Bloat tends to primarily affect large, deep-chested dogs. Doberman Pinschers, German Shepherds, Standard Poodles, Great Danes, Saint Bernards, Irish Setters, and Gordon Setters are affected most frequently.

  • Excessive exercise should be avoided to decrease the likelihood of bloat, and consumption of large volumes of water after exercise should be avoided to limit distention of the stomach.
  • Your pet should fed smaller meals more frequently over the course of the day, rather than a few large meals.
  •  If your pet show signs of bloat, contact your Vet immediately. Avoid giving anything from mouth. Don’t attempt to relieve gas on your own. 


Urolithiasis- Urolithiasis is a disease caused by the presence and effects of stones or excessive amounts of crystals in the urinary tract. It is also called cystitis, urethritis, urinary calculi, bladder stones, or kidney stones. Urethral obstruction is more common in males. Urolithiasis is very painful condition for pets and though all dogs treated for urolithiasis, 20-50% will have recurrence of the problem and accompanying pain if preventive measures are not taken. Some dietary management can reduce risk of occurrence of urolithiasis in your dogs. Such as-

  • Water intake should be encouraged. Moist food will increase water consumption and formation of less concentrated urine. Small amounts of flavoring substances can be added to water sources to encourage consumption. Ice cubes can be given as treats or snacks.
  • Avoid excess dietary protein. Restrict high quality dietary protein to 10 to 18% dry matter.
  • Restrict sodium to less than 0.3% dry matter. If treats are fed, their sodium content should be checked. They should be limited to less than 10% of the daily diet.
  • Be patient, but firm with your dog. The success or failure of treatment depends to a large degree on strict adherence to the new diet.
  • Confinement, lack of regular exercise contribute to the formation of crystals and uroliths.
  • If urine is completely stopped then don’t give any water unless consulting your Vet.

 

Dehydration- Excessive loss of water cause dehydration. Increased output or decreased input of water can cause dehydration. Dehydration often accompanies vomiting, diarrhea, hypothermia, fever, no access to water, and other conditions. Dehydration and its severity can be diagnosed by skin turgor test.  If the skin is slow to return to position, the animal is at least 5% dehydrated. If the skin does not return fully to its position, the animal is 10% to 12% dehydrated and is likely in critical condition. Sunken and Dry eyes also indicate dehydration. Tongue and gums appear dry in dehydration.

  • Pet owner can give frequent, small amounts of water by mouth.
  • Move the pet to a cool (not cold) environment.
  • Avoid feeding of dry food and immediate access to ample amount of water after dehydration.


Diarrhea – Diarrhea is the frequent evacuation of watery stools. Diarrhea may occur due to gastroenteritis, Poisoning, Dietary indiscretion etc. In such cases you may follow general thumbrule.

  • Don’t give food and water.
  • Check if any dehydration.
  • If the diarrhea continues, seek veterinary attention. Do not medicate your pet without talking to your veterinarian.
  • Diarrhea quickly leads to serious fluid loss and electrolyte imbalance, especially in the pups and the very old. Infections which cause diarrhea are contagious so isolate the sick pet from other pets. Check for fever, it indicates infection most of the time.
  • Drugs should be selected for avoid fluid loss not for changing consistency of feaces.

 

Heat stroke – If your pet’s skin is hot to the touch and if your dog is vomiting, drooling, rapidly panting, show loss of coordination, unconscious then it may be suffering with heat stroke. If temperature goes above 106 o c then it is an emergency. If you notice such changes in your pet then - 

  • Remove the animal from the heat.
  • You can move the pet to the shade and direct a fan on him.
  • Rubbing skin and abdomen with alcohol proved helpful.
  • Use cold water, ice packs, or wet towels to cool the head but do not immerse the animal in cold water.
  • Offer small amounts of water after the pet has begun to cool down.
  • Record rectal temperature if possible and consult to Vet immediately.


Electrocution - Fallen transmission wires, faulty electrical circuits, or chewing on an electrical cord make your pet prone to get an electric shock. Electrocution is a life-threatening emergency. Some bullet point instructions may help you to handle such situation.

  • Do not touch the pet until the electrical source has been turned off or moved. Immediately shut off the electricity.
  • Use wooden stick to move the pet away from the source of the electricity.
  • Check for breathing and pulse.
  • Apply cool compresses to burns if any.
  • Prevent heat loss by covering the pet with a blanket.
  • Though your pet seems perfectly normal after being separated from the source of electricity. Seek veterinary attention as soon as possible.
  • Do not give any medications or liquids unless instructed to by a veterinarian.
  • Animals that survive may require supportive and symptomatic therapy. 

 

Moving an Injured Animal- Safe transportation of injured pet to Veterinary care center is of utmost importance. Harsh transportation may aggravate the situation. 

  • Minimize motion of its head, neck, and spine. Support can be provided. Avoid any jerking or thrashing motions
  • Keep the head level or slightly elevated during transport if your pet looks disoriented.
  • Cats can be transported in boxes with holes.
  • Injured animals must be approached carefully, and you should first take precautions for your own safety.
  • Handle your pet gently and avoid more handling.
  • You can cover the pet with blanket. It gives calming effect and prevent heat loss from the patient.